PHILADELPHIA -- Shane Victorino has enjoyed some of the best years of his life in Philadelphia.

It is one reason why he gives back to the community.

"It means a lot to be involved because of what the community does for us," Victorino said. "They come out every night to support us. It's a small way of saying thank you."

Victorino is the Phillies' nominee for the Roberto Clemente Award presented by Chevrolet. He will be honored Wednesday at Citizens Bank Park. The 30 nominees from 30 teams have immersed themselves in the type of humanitarian and community efforts that distinguished the life of Clemente, whose life ended at 38 on New Year's Eve 1972, when his plane crashed on the way to delivering aid to Nicaraguan earthquake victims.

Fans have the opportunity to participate in the selection of a national winner. They can cast votes for any of the 30 club nominees through Oct. 8.

The fan-ballot winner will be tallied as one vote among those cast by a special selection panel of baseball dignitaries and media members. The panel includes Commissioner Bud Selig and Vera Clemente, widow of the Hall of Fame right fielder.

Voting fans also will be automatically registered for a chance to win a trip for four to the 2010 World Series to see the national winner presented with the Roberto Clemente Award.

"I'm in a position to give back," Victorino said. "My father and mom were always involved in the community, not so much financially, but they would give their time and effort. And you could see the good in what they did. So it means a lot to give back to the community. If you're in a position to give back, I think it means a lot to help others. This team has done a very good job of that."

The Shane Victorino Foundation was established this year to "promote opportunities for under-served youth in Philadelphia and Hawaii by engaging in projects which provide children with educational, recreational and wellness programs."

The foundation kick-started things with a $900,000 pledge to the Boys & Girls Clubs of Philadelphia to renovate its Nicetown facility, which was built in 1892.

Victorino also hosted a fashion show last month, which raised funds for the foundation.

"The big picture is it's about the kids," Victorino said. "It's not about where we live or where we're from. It's about giving back to the community and giving back to the kids and being a role model. I think giving the kids some kind of direction."