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The Wright Thing

To recognize extraordinary volunteers in the Sandy Relief effort and to get the word out that there is still plenty of work to be done, David Wright launched "The Wright Thing" at the start of the 2013 season.

Honorees are invited to Citi Field to meet David before the game, install third base with the grounds crew, sit along the third base line, and enjoy an in-game video on Citi Vision that features their meeting.

A public service announcement follows in which David directs fans to NYC Service and NY Cares to participate in the ongoing relief effort.

Jerry Chan led a group of volunteers that worked seven days a week at the Knickerbocker Village in Manhattan, going door to door delivering food and supplies to 3,000 residents, many of whom were elderly.

When Elaine Gil went to the Petrides High School hurricane center in Staten Island the day after the storm, she had no idea that would become her daily routine for days to come as she made sure that children had smiles on their faces. After its closure, she organized numerous fundraisers to collect food, clothing and supplies for families.

Precious Asiedu and other members of the Bronx YMCA's Super Star Teens took matters into their own hands by putting together a relief team to clean up their Y so that it was able to open when power was restored weeks later.

After moving his own family in Belle Harbour, Queens, to higher ground, off-duty firefighter Tommy Woods and his son Brendan, repeatedly returned via surfboard and kayak to guide 25 neighbors to safety thru surging water, downed trees and debris.

Silaka Cox and Khaleel Anderson, members of the Rockaway Youth Task Force and more familiar with the Rockaways than FEMA and the American Red Cross , assisted both agencies in identifying areas most in need. They, along with RYTF founder, Milan Taylor, led the way in coordinating donations, volunteers and a distribution plan.

Matthew Petronis was watching the destruction of Hurricane Sandy on his hometown of Breezy Point, Queens, on his television from his dorm room at Catholic University in Washington, DC. He took action that very night by setting up a fundraising campaign online that has grown to over $1 million for the Breezy Point Relief Fund.